Edison and LSO

Innovation. Discovery. Leadership.

NEXT WEEK, we’d like to invite you to join us as we celebrate these three qualities through discussion and music.

At the LSO, these qualities inform what we do, from our Healing Art of Music Program to our Community Conversations and to LSO on Call.

Join us:

Best known for his invention of the electric light bulb, Thomas Edison's spirit of innovation, creativity, and discovery continues to inspire today. A visionary and leader, Edison constantly worked for transformation and progress. When establishing his group of collaborators at Menlo Park, he asked that they “…possess a vision of things that did not yet exist.” The Longwood Symphony and acclaimed Boston actor Jeremiah Kissel bring Edison’s story to life with music by Hollywood composer Kevin Kaska.

Earlier in the week, members of the LSO will participate in Boston’s 2nd annual HUBWeek, a celebration of Education, Science and Technology: Leadership: Finding Your Voice in Music & Medicine.

Just as physicians constantly search for the best therapies and research methods to better serve their patients, musicians also seek better techniques and methods to fully express themselves. Both disciplines utilize leadership and collaboration to effectively work together and achieve common goals in groups large and small.  

Reflecting on Mozart and Medicine, our musicians and panelists will discuss: What does it mean to lead? How do we learn? When should we lead and when should we follow? How do we communicate from each perspective?

The LSO's own Emily Hsieh, Terry Buchmiller, MD, Lisa Wong, MD, Julie Reimann, MD/PhD, and Mark Gebhardt, MD take the stage and relate their medical and musical experiences through Mozart. Visionary, biomedical entrepreneur, and cellist Christoph Westphal joins us in the conversation, setting the tone for what promises to be a truly "enlightening" evening.

In DC's Museum of American History, one of Edison's light bulbs from the 1870s.

In DC's Museum of American History, one of Edison's light bulbs from the 1870s.

Announcing Wolfram Goessling, HMS Director of HST!

Longtime LSO trumpeter, Dr. Wolfram Goessling, was recently appointed as the new Harvard Medical School director of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program and the new advisory dean and director of the Irving M. London Society. 

Goessling practices medicine at Brigham and Women's and Dana Farber, specializing in hematology-oncology and gastroenterology. He also teaches at Harvard Medical School. Goessling is an incredible physician, researcher, educator, and mentor, and we are very excited about his new leadership role!

LSO participating in HUBweek

Join members of the Longwood Symphony Orchestra for a special HUBweek performance at the Harvard Ed Portal in Brighton. In this hybrid lecture/performance, you'll hear from luminaries in the fields of music, medicine, and beyond sharing their research about leadership and experience leading in groups large and small. The Longwood Symphony Orchestra will explore the topic through a curated set of performances demonstrating the varied ways leadership can function in both music and medicine.

Click HERE to inquire for more details and to reserve tickets.  

Wheelock College Bestows LSO's Lisa Wong with Honorary Doctorate

Lisa Wong, LSO Past President and violinist/violist, received an honorary doctorate from Wheelock College on May 20, 2016. Continue reading below for Wheelock's beautiful write-up of her address to the students. We're proud to call Lisa one of our own!

Graduate Commencement Speaker Dr. Lisa Wong, a musician, pediatrician, author, and lifelong arts advocate, told the graduates that she grew up in Honolulu, where both her parents were the children of Chinese immigrants and the first in their families to go to college. Her father earned a law degree and was later appointed as the first Chinese-American federal judge in the U.S. Her mother was an elementary school teacher. Both parents instilled in all five of their children an appreciation for both education and music.

"Clear rules, structure, but with a sense of fun and a time for play—that's the recipe for lifelong learning," said Wong, who said her parents' approach launched her 50-year love affair with the violin. She joined a children's orchestra that traveled throughout the Hawaiian islands. "My violin, I found, was a change maker," she said. "My violin, the orchestra, and I traveled to other islands to play for schools where kids had never heard symphonic music."

During high school, the orchestra visited hospitals, where Wong said she learned how music can bring joy to children who were sick or in pain. By the time she left for college, she was determined to try to create a career path that somehow included music, education, health, and community service. She said she explored an opportunity to work as a pediatric cardiologist in a fast-paced ICU, but decided instead to become a family pediatrician and and founder of the Longwood Symphony Orchestra's "Healing Art of Music Program."

"I've come to understand and appreciate life's long view," she said. "In my practice, I care for children when they're born until they graduate from college. That is a privilege."

Wong urged the graduates to embrace the arts, no matter what field they choose. "Students of every age simply learn better through the arts; the playfulness, structure, and freedom of the arts are essential for all of us," she said. "A traumatized child may open up through a shared song. A non-verbal child may find her voice through drawing. The arts can't end with preschool curriculum. Incorporate the arts in every level."

Honoring a Mentor with Music

Ronald Arky, the Daniel D. Federman, M.D. Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Medical Education, is celebrated as a Longwood Symphony Orchestra community champion at the organization's Healing Art of Music gala on April 9. Arky has mentored generations of students, serving as a faculty member at HMS for over 50 years and as advisory dean and director of the Francis Weld Peabody Society for nearly 30 of those years.

Photos by Bethany Versoy for Harvard Medical School

Photos by Bethany Versoy for Harvard Medical School

Photos by Bethany Versoy for Harvard Medical School

Photos by Bethany Versoy for Harvard Medical School